Aguado ’13 Leads Social Media Strategies for MLB

E.J. Aguado, a 2013 graduate who works as a new media strategist for MLB Advanced Media, is featured in the Summer 2017 issue of Rowan Magazine.

Aguado develops social media strategies for the Phillies, Cubs, Dodgers, Braves, Orioles, Indians, Twins and Rays and credits his experience writing for The Whit and his Sport Journalism courses as key to his career.

“Writing is super important for social media,” says Aguado, “That’s why I think they were impressed with me. My job didn’t exist 15 years ago. How people worked with the teams three years ago is completely different from what happens today. There are so many opportunities.”

Read the full article below.


Sports [front and] center: Aguado ’13 leads social media strategies for MLB teams – Rowan Magazine, Summer 2017

E.J. Aguado ’13 has a dream job…and how tweet it is.

Consider this: In just the past year, Aguado witnessed firsthand the Chicago Cubs’ historic World Series win, saw the Cleveland Indians claim the American League pennant, spent 12- hour days capturing social media content on the eld at the Major League Baseball All-Star Game in Miami, and joined the Cubs at the White House, where he rubbed elbows with President Barack Obama.

“It’s incredible,” Aguado says of his work as a new media strategist for MLB Advanced Media. From the commissioner’s office on Park Avenue in New York City, Aguado acts as a liaison with MLB teams to develop social media strategies. His teams include the Phillies, Cubs, Dodgers, Braves, Orioles, Indians, Twins and Rays.

Hired by MLB just three months after earning his bachelor’s degree in Law & Justice Studies— with a minor in journalism—from Rowan, Aguado’s snappy, informative, entertaining Twitter style and his knowledge of the game caught the attention of MLB executives. Through hard work and a detail-oriented approach, he turned a part-time position with MLB into a full-time job as a new media strategist.

“When it comes to social media, one mistake can cost you your job,” says Aguado. “You need reliability and accuracy and attention to detail. I just put my head down and worked as hard as I could.”

Great writing helped too, says Aguado. While an undergraduate, he wrote for sports web sites and The Whit, Rowan’s student newspaper. He also was a freelancer for Fox News Latino.

“Writing is super important for social media,” says Aguado, “That’s why I think they were impressed with me. My job didn’t exist 15 years ago. How people worked with the teams three years ago is completely different from what happens today. There are so many opportunities.”

Aguado particularly relishes promoting America’s pastime to new generations through social media platforms.

“We have a big incoming class of young stars,” says Aguado. “Teams are primed to play well in the future. I want to find new ways to make the game exciting, to bring new elements into it. We’re working to better educate the young fans.”

With a diverse portfolio of MLB teams, Aguado needs to be in tune with the cities— and their fans. Different strategies resonate differently from city to city, fan base to fan base, he notes.

“Some teams are cheekier than others,” he explains. “Every team has a different style. You learn their style and you try to shape what you’re delivering to them. Every year, I learn more and more about my teams.”

Through his work, Aguado works directly with high-profile players. Though most become “regular” guys to him, the Yankees’ Derek Jeter, his childhood idol, was an exception, he says. Meeting Obama with the Cubs after their World Series win also was thrilling, he adds.

“I was in a trance,” Aguado admits. “I met him and got a great picture. It was neat to see the players out of their comfort zone at the White House. They were nervous.”

In addition to baseball, he is a “huge football and basketball fan.” Knowing about all sports is an asset, says Aguado, who adds that Rowan sports journalism classes he took with adjunct professor Phil Anastasia helped convince him to look into sports as a career.

“Next year is my fifth year working in social media,” says Aguado, 26. “My whole life pretty much revolves around sports right now. And I love it.”

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